Honor and Loyalty : World events: resounding resurgence of polarisation

It never rains, but pours.

Are the omens implied in this popular saying coming true?

This time again from Europe, the springboard of the only two world wars ever experienced? Once again, is the whole world about to be dragged into a terrible adventure, a calamity caused by a quarrel between neighbouring cousins?

In any case, this is the trend that seems to be taking shape as the days go by. Not so much that the warmongering spirit prevails on all continents, but because many, if not most, countries of some continents are being urged to take sideswith one or other of the Parties in conflict.

As a matter of fact, without being completely global, at least for the moment, the current war in Europe is no less total, as long as it involves all the aspects, namely military, diplomatic, economic and technological, as well as the fields of finance, sports, science, culture, and communication among others.

From sanctions to counter-sanctions, from punishments to retaliation, an ever-widening rift is gradually pushing away the opposing factions, each keen to count its allies.

African countries in particular have thus become the target of declarations or promises of friendship full of communicative undertones, denigration and stigmatisation campaigns, and so many thinly veiled threats against those who resist any idea of confrontation dictated from the outside.

Without being tenable, a middle position between the pros and cons will nonetheless have serious consequences, as are the other options. It is therefore all about personal convictions, the desire for self-determination and the ability to make one’s voice heard, in defence ofone’s own interests.

In this tumultuous environment mainly fostered by those nostalgic about dominion, sphere of influence, exclusive domain and strategic depth, the only thing we can be almost certain of is the end of the globalisationdream and the resounding resurgence of polarisation.

If globalisation, which is still in the process of being tested, could fuel the ambition to break down the ideological barriers that until now have been the main obstacles to the freedom of partnerships between actors on the international scene, the resurgence of polarisation amidstgunfire is aimed at re-establishing the lines of demarcation of yesteryear.

The greatest risk of this situation for Africa is that it finds itself torn between ideological blocs, dismembered by political or criminal opportunistic conflicts, this Africa already significantly undermined by terroristactivity.

Our continent could thus see its dream of finally wielding influencethanks to its size, diversity, resources and all its potential fade away.

It is therefore imperative for this continent to unite its voices and its forces, to resist both the attractions and the pressures, in order to define its own voice.

So, when the time comes, will Africa be able to automatically and legally take a place around the negotiating table to put an end to hostilities, instead of being the menu that will be shared by the protagonists of current and future conflicts? /-

Navy Captain

ATONFACK GUEMO,

Head of Communication Division - MINDEF